Neither homophobic nor the opposite: UEFA | sports



Is there anything more political than washing your hands in the face of the stigmatization of a group like the LGTBIQA?

There is an age for everything, also to believe that football can function as a tool for change, integration and development, but it is no longer mine. I start to comb gray hair, you know? I swallowed those matches against drugs from the lead years whole, and even used my social networks to share some of the awareness campaigns promoted by UEFA, you know: the respect and all that. We want to believe, of course; our intentions are never entirely bad. In fact, we like football so much that, as a general rule, we prefer to look the other way when we discover a stain on the ball, an expression coined by Maradona and outraged in those offices where the future of a sport that became king is decided, yes, but now he is lowering his pants – and whatever it takes – to the demands of the satraps and fascistoids on duty. “We are not involved in politics,” says UEFA in its penultimate statement, the one in which they justified their refusal to allow the Allianz Arena to receive the Hungarian national team illuminated with the rainbow flag. Is there anything more political than washing your hands in the face of the stigmatization of a group like the LGTBIQA? Neither in favor of homophobia nor against, in short: the joke is told alone.

Just a few days before this, by the way, UEFA itself opened an investigation to determine the origin of the racist insults during the Hungary-France in Budapest: as soon as they dig, they will end up with their noses stuck in their own drawers, unable to anticipate what could happen when an openly racist and homophobic federation – let alone the government of a country – is awarded a tournament venue. Didn’t you see what happened in Russia during the last World Cup? Surely yes, because they have also rewarded it: let it not be said that the Swiss giants do not care to punish those who pass their good words and other grandiose slogans through the money counting machine.

The Barça statement is useless if the Spanish Super Cup is to be played in Saudi Arabia afterwards, ignoring the fact that gays and lesbians are thrown off the roofs of the tallest buildings there.

“Why is there no declared gay playing the Euro?” Asks everyone who looks at the world of football from a distance. There are more than six hundred summoned to represent their respective countries, enough to make the statistics good and denounce, once and for all, that the homosexual footballer is still considered a problem, not the structure that oppresses him and protects the status quo : That’s what UEFA should be doing at this time, but no. His subsequent statement, with the rainbow-edged shield, is useless if he is unable to create the favorable context for footballers to express their sexual condition in freedom, if they wish. There is no use in the Barça statement if the Spanish Super Cup is going to be played in Saudi Arabia afterwards, ignoring the fact that gays and lesbians are thrown there from the roofs of the tallest buildings. Ultimately, you cannot trust UEFA or the big clubs. It is the hour of the footballers, of the true protagonists. And each day that passes without raising their voices, football moves a little further away from a future that is already, at least, uncertain.

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